Author Archive for Jack Ackerman

22
Jul
17

14 American-Made Clothing Brands You Can Wear With Pride

Source: 14 American-Made Clothing Brands You Can Wear With Pride

14 American-Made Clothing Brands You Can Wear With Pride

Here is a great list from Good Trade

Made in USA

In our search for ethical products, we’re constantly looking for brands that value transparency and quality and reject the practices that surround cheaply made fast-fashion. We’ve found that buying for quality is one of the keys to simple and sustainable living. When we purchase something that lasts, we consume less and live a simpler life. Additionally, transparency allows us to understand where our products came from and the impact they have had on people and planet along every step of the supply chain. American-made clothing brands make a persistent bet on long-lasting quality and radical transparency.

We’ve searched for our favorite men’s & women’s American-made clothing brands making high quality basics like denim, tees, sweatshirts right here in the USA. Beyond just the basics, we’ve added a few brands that make formalwear, bridal wear and lingerie. Check out these brands keeping their design and manufacturing in the USA.


Baldwin Denim & Collection

Based In | Kansas City, MO
Best For | Raw denim
Product Range | Denim, tees, hats, dresses, knitwear, outerwear
Price Range | $18-$50

Founded and designed by Matt Baldwin, Baldwin Denim & Collection is a Kansas City-based clothing and lifestyle brand, founded on modern design, quality textiles, and American manufacturing. Baldwin is an all-time favorite of ours, not just because of our love for Kansas City, but because each design stems from both East and West Coast influences put through a modern filter of the Middle of the country. Their men’s and women’s ready-to-wear collections capture a timeless modernism.

Shop Baldwin Denim & Collection Online


American Giant

Based In | San Francisco, CA
Best For | Comfortable sweatshirts
Product Range | Sweatshirts, shirts, polos, bottoms
Price Range | $24-$119

Often referred to as the company that made “the greatest hoodie ever,” American Giant believes in exceptional quality materials and customer service. Typically, 80% of what we pay to traditional retailers has nothing to do with the production of the garment; American Giant ensures that 100% of your purchase supports their USA-made and 100% cotton apparel. They shy away from traditional marketing methods like billboards and the appeal of brick-and-mortar stores, and instead invest in selling directly to American consumers and providing them with outstanding service. With cotton grown and sewn in the Carolinas, relentless attention to detail, top-of-the-line fabrics, and custom hardware, you’ll feel super comfy and proud to wear one of their sweatshirts.

Shop American Giant Online


AMVI

Based In | Los Angeles, CA
Best For | Basic essentials
Product Range | Tees, knit tops, bottoms
Price Range | $48-$80

AMVI stands for American Made, Vintage Inspired, and you can see the American influence in all of their apparel. Their high-quality basic essentials will be the ideal foundation for your wardrobe in no time, from their richly colored dolman tees to their comfort leggings you’ll want to wear every day. Designed and produced in Los Angeles, AMVI works only with local vendors to avoid traditional retail markups, and to help support jobs and the US economy, a core value that we love and admire.

Shop AMVI Online


Imogene + Willie

Based In | Nashville, TN
Best For | Signature denim
Product Range | Jeans, textiles, jewelry
Price Range | $50-$350

Friends for 20 years and ultimately lifelong partners, Matt and Carrie Eddmenson yearned to make long-lasting denim right here in the states. Imogene + Willie first started through one email campaign to friends and family with the hopes of selling 250 pairs in 2009, and now they are a staple in the USA-made denim industry. Their rich coloring, tailored fits, and woodsy inspiration make each pair of jeans a piece of signature denim you’ll cherish forever. (Not into denim? I+W also sells everything from towels to toothbrushes in their “Objects” section!)

Shop Imogene + Willie Online


Reformation

Based In | Los Angeles, CA
Best For | Bridal wear
Product Range | Dresses, bridal wear, outerwear, jumpsuits
Price Range | $98-$278 {Bridal wear ranges from $198-$588}

Sustainability is something we should all care about when it comes to our clothes, and Reformation makes sure each of their pieces are as sustainable as possible. Created in 2009 by Yael Aflalo, they design and manufacture limited-edition collections in their own sewing factory in downtown Los Angeles. This B Corp utilizes a heat reflecting roof, sources renewable energy, has recycled hangers in their stores, and uses 100% recycled packaging for every order shipped. Their lacy dresses, sheer tops, and statement skirts will be sure to turn heads no matter where you go. They also carry a bridal wear collection with the most elegant dresses we’ve ever seen, which will flow perfectly when you’re walking down the aisle. Fashion has never looked or felt better.

Shop Reformation Online


Buck Mason

Based In | Los Angeles, CA
Best For | Effortless style, minimum-decision apparel
Product Range | Henleys, pants, classic tees, belts
Price Range | $25-$175

Erik Schnakenberg and Sasha Koehn began Buck Mason, in an effort to craft designs that would be timeless, durable, and true-to-character for the everyday American man. From sand chinos ideal for the workday, to their rockstar-inspired dark wash jeans, this look is perfect for the guy who wants to look good without too much effort. They even offer pre-made packages of well-matched tops and bottoms to try, ideal for effortless style and you only pay for what you keep. Using cotton from North Carolina and produced in Los Angeles, they provide a step-by-step look at the production process. You’ll always feel calm, cool, and collected in their apparel.

Shop Buck Mason Online


Grown & Sewn

Based In | New York City, NY
Best For | Pants
Product Range | Bottoms, boots, tops
Price Range | $50-$275

Former Men’s Design Director for Ralph Lauren, Rob Magness created Grown & Sewn as a tribute to American history and culture. They feature handmade pants, Thorogood boots, and knit v-necks that feel as broken in and comfortable as they do stylish. The painted patterns and patches are applied by hand by an artist, one at a time, so you know you’re wearing a one-of-a-kind straight from the USA every time. Their vintage and artisan pieces will only get better over time.

Shop Grown & Sewn Online


Welcome Stranger

Based In | San Francisco, CA
Best For | Rugged apparel
Product Range | Vests, pants, jackets, and shirts
Price Range | $55-$250

For the outdoorsy man in your life, Welcome Stranger produces apparel that is both rugged and stylish. Designed and crafted in San Francisco since 2010, their collection draws inspiration from nature, west of the Bay Area. For a more tailored fit, they also create handmade trousers, coats, and jackets. If you’re in the area, they have storefronts in San Francisco and Berkeley where you can try on their reversible coats, lined vests, knit caps, and ¾-sleeved shirts. Clothes so comfortable, you’ll never feel like a stranger in them.

Shop Welcome Stranger Online


Haspel

Based In | New Orleans, LA
Best For | Formalwear
Product Range | Trousers, Jackets, Suit Separates, Ties
Price Range | $135-$695

For over a century, Haspel has embodied Southern hospitality and charm through their wash-and-wear trousers, jackets, ties, and formalwear. From Gregory Peck in To Kill A Mockingbird, to President Calvin Coolidge, you’ve seen Haspel on every true gentleman since 1909, and we love the clean, simple aesthetic in every piece. Made exclusively in America, Haspel uses seersucker cloth that can withstand New Orleans heat and provide a stylish look for all.

Shop Haspel Online


Beyond Clothing

Based In | Seattle, WA
Best For | Outdoor wear
Product Range | Undergarments, pullovers, jackets
Price Range | $65-$335

If you spend more time in the great outdoors than anywhere else, Beyond Clothing has a custom wardrobe just for you. Their mission is to create durable apparel through a layering system, optimized for survival in temperatures from -40℉ to more moderate temps above 45℉. From design to creation, the entire process stays within the states, to ensure higher quality, more efficient production, and innovation. Whether you’re wearing their parka made for frigid conditions, or a simple pullover while hiking, we think you’ll be poised for comfort in any environment.

Shop Beyond Clothing Online


Flynn Skye

Based In | Venice Beach, CA
Best For | Boho chic
Product Range | Dresses, tops, jumpers, bottoms
Price Range | $85-$205

Inspired by her daughter’s free spirit, Amber Farr combined rockstar edginess and femininity for Flynn Skye. Their gorgeous, flowy, and light dresses are perfect for a day at the beach or a night out on the town. American-made in Venice Beach and Los Angeles, and inspired by cities like London, Tahoe, and Malibu, you’ll be able to rock this look for any event without having to think twice.

Shop Flynn Skye Online


Hackwith Design House

Based In | St. Paul, MN
Best For | One-of-a-kind staples
Product Range | Dresses, jumpers, jackets, plus sizes
Price Range | $85-$325

Looking for apparel that’s both comfortable and stylish can be tough, and finding unique designs is even tougher: that’s where Minnesota-based Hackwith Design House comes in. Their apparel lines include simple and clean basics, swim, and plus-size pieces, where everyone can find a piece they’ll wear forever. We most love their comfort capes and ultra-soft tunics. Plus, every Monday, they release a limited edition piece available for only a short time – if you’re looking for staple pieces that no one else will have, Hackwith Design House is for you!

Shop Hackwith Design House Online


Fibre Athletics

Based In | Chicago, IL
Best For | Workout gear
Product Range | Zip-up hoodies, tops/tees, hats
Price Range | $60-$149

If you’re always looking for the newest trend in clothes and love a good workout, Fibre Athletics may be your one-stop shop! Fibre Athletics aims to create apparel that comforts your lifestyle, shelters your body, and supports the world around us, through 100% organic and recycled fabrics. Their pieces are produced in the USA, where all employees earn living wages in safe working conditions. And, your impact is even bigger than in just the USA alone: with every purchase you make, they donate to environmental restoration and poverty alleviation projects around the globe.

Shop Fibre Athletics Online


Brook There

Based In | Los Angeles, CA
Best For | Lingerie
Product Range | Undergarments, apparel, scarves, eye masks
Price Range | $32-$118

For your most intimate moments, you’ll love Brook There. They sort lingerie by size, price, and ethics. Want vegan-made undergarments? Want a pair of undies cut and sewn in Maine? How about a US-milled organic cotton slip? You’ll find everything you’ve ever wanted here, and we love their wireless bras and breathable chemises. Since 2007, designer Brook DeLorme has prioritized comfort and health in each of these pieces handmade in Portland, Maine. Feeling comfortable in your own skin will be effortlessly easy.

Shop Brooke There Online

About The Good Trade

Launched in Los Angeles in 2014 as a community for ethically-minded consumers, The Good Trade is an online publication featuring brands, products & ideas creating positive social change. 

The Good Trade was built on the fundamental idea consumers are collectively powerful and capable of driving significant social change through their everyday purchases, consumer preferences and lifestyle choices.

Our team envisions a world where ethically minded consumers vote with their everyday purchases for a world that is sustainable and free from forced labor.


20
Jul
17

Robert Reich – What does it Mean Made in America

19
Jul
17

The White House is Celebrating Made in America Week — But Not Without Criticism

Source: The White House is Celebrating Made in America Week — But Not Without Criticism | Alliance for American Manufacturing

This week is about celebrating Made in America. But is the #FakePresident the one to really tout “Made in America”? The article is from The Alliance for American manufacturing.

President Trump is under fire for his reliance on foreign manufacturing for his own products.

Here at the Alliance for American Manufacturing, we live every week like it’s Made in America Week.

But the official Made in America Week is currently happening, and President Trump has a whole host of activities lined up to celebrate.

The fun kicked off on Monday at the White House with the “Made in America Product Showcase,” which highlighted an American company from every state. On Wednesday, the president is scheduled to participate in a “Made in America certification event,” and on Thursday, the president is planning a “Made in America announcement.” Things wrap up Saturday in Norfolk, Va., where Trump will attend the commissioning of the Gerald R. Ford CVN 78 aircraft carrier.

But almost as soon as he announced Made in America week, Trump was criticized for not practicing what he preaches. Multiple news outlets have pointed out that many Trump brand products are made overseas, and frankly, some of that criticism is deserved. Here’s the Washington Post:

“For Trump, highlighting U.S.-made products is inconsistent with his practices as a businessman. For years, the Trump organization has outsourced much of its product manufacturing, relying on a global network of factories in a dozen countries — including Bangladesh, China and Mexico — to make its clothing, home décor pieces and other items.”

The Huffington Post also pointed out that Trump’s use of steel and aluminum from China was a big issue during the 2016 presidential campaign, and the president’s daughter/adviser Ivanka Trump is also under fire for her reliance on overseas factories to produce her fashion line. The Daily Beast traveled to the Trump International Hotel in Washington to check out the goods in the gift shop, which had a Made in America T-shirt but nearly everything else for sale was manufactured overseas. (Side note: We offered up some American-made suggestions for the hotel back in September 2016.)

Even the conservative-leaning Washington Examiner ran an op-ed pointing out Trump’s hypocrisy on Made in America.

“’America First’ sounds good when you are the president, but, we all know that whenever money’s been on the table in his extravagant, Napoleon-like penthouse in Manhattan, it’s always been ‘Trump First,’” contributor Mark Vargas wrote.

Ouch.

It’s unclear what might come out of Made in America week — past theme weeks have been overshadowed by current events, often at Trump’s own making. And there’s no doubt that Trump has divided the country, with his opponents pledging to fight him on all fronts.

But whatever you think of Trump, we hope that you can get behind Made in America.

We’ve featured many of the companies taking part in the White House showcase on the blog and our annual gift guide, and our summer interns even talked about their favorite Made in America companies on The Manufacturing Report podcast this week.

American-made goods create jobs and help grow the economy. If every American committed to buying $64 worth of American-made purchases each year, 200,000 new jobs would be created. If contractors increased use of American-made materials by just 5 percent, an additional 200,000 new jobs would be created.

American-made products are also better for the environment, from consumer goods to big industrial needs like steel and aluminum. That’s one of the reasons why a deeply blue state like California is moving toward buying its steel locally — American mills abide by strict environmental guidelines, leading to less pollution to both produce steel and ship it to where it is needed.

And American-made products are often of higher quality than their foreign-made counterparts. There have been serious concerns over China’s lax safety regulations, for example, from everything from toothpaste to toys to dog treats and even processed chicken.

Made in America matters. It’s also perhaps one of the few issues that Americans tend to agree on — 95 percent of voters polled in 2014 had a favorable view of American-made products.

We know that you can’t always buy American-made, but we encourage you to do so when you can. Check the label when you are out shopping, for example. Do a little research on American-made options before making a big purchase like a home appliance or new car.

And we also hope that Team Trump finally steps up and shifts Trump Organization product manufacturing to the United States (Ivanka Trump should also work to manufacture at least some of her clothing line here). Even moving production of just one or two items would go a long way to showing Trump isn’t all talk when it comes to Made in America — and it will support job creation and the economy along the way.

18
Jul
17

American Made Shoes: The Ultimate Source List – USA Love List

Source: American Made Shoes: The Ultimate Source List – USA Love List

This is the updated list from USA Love List

American Made Shoes: The Ultimate Source List

The ultimate list of every brand still making shoes in the USA.

Everyone is looking for American made shoes. I admit, they are difficult to find, but  I’ve put together this extensive list. It contains brands that make all of their shoes in the USA, but I’ve also listed brands whose lines contain some made in USA shoes and some that are imported.  Always check your labels and look for Made in USA before you buy! (Sandals featured in cover image are by Mohop.)

We have Ultimate Source Lists for Men’s Shoes Made in the USA, Made in USA Work Boots, Hiking Boots & More, a Source Guide For Shoes Made in California, Made in USA Boots for Cold, Snow and Rain,  and Sandals Made in the USA as well. Check out our sources for American made socks too!

Our Top Picks for American Made Footwear

American Made Sneakers: SOM Footwear

If you think there aren’t any American made sneakers out there, think again. We’ve found SOM Footwear, shoes designed for an active lifestyle. The shoe’s minimalist design gives you the freedom and stability of barefoot walking with all the protection and support you need.  Each shoe is built with a specialized toe box and heel, so hard to fit feet get ultimate comfort.  All SOM Footwear is made in Colorado of the highest quality weather-proof materials.

Capps Shoe Company is 100% made in USA in our factory located on the border between Virginia and North Carolina in Gretchen, Virginia. The company has over 175 employees with an average shoemaking experience of over 12 years – its skilled craftsman are among the most talented shoe makers in the world. Capps footwear is approved for use by the Army & Air Force Exchange Service, Nexcom, and the National Park Service, as well as Police, Sheriff and Fire Department.

American Made Shoes: The Ultimate Source List

If you notice that we have missed your favorite American made shoe brand, please let us know in the comments and we will add them to our list!

  • Alden, men’s dress shoes, made in Middleborough, Massachusetts since 1884
  • Allen Edmonds, men’s dress shoes, casual shoes and boots, made in Wisconsin
  • Aurora Shoe Co shoes for men and women are handmade in upstate New York
  • Cade & Co, infant shoes made in Park City, Utah
  • Calleen Cordero women’s shoes are made in California.
  • California Magdesians, made in City of Industry, California
  • Carolina, men’s work boots (only select styles are made in USA)
  • Capps Shoe Company, men’s and women’s dress shoes made in Virginia
  • Chacos’ MyChacos collection that’s made Rockford, Michigan (other styles are not American made)
  • Chippewa Boots, loafers & rugged work & fashion boots for men & women (only select styles)
  • CYDWOQ, men and women’s boots, flats, boots, made in Burbank, California
  • Danner offers select styles of made in USA hiking boots, hunting boots, work boots, and urban wear boots.
  • Eastland, has a ‘Made in Maine Collection’ of shoes for men and women
  • Eliza B, youth and women’s flip flops, made in Connecticut
  • Esquivel luxury leather shoes for men and women are handcrafted by skilled artisans in southern California.
  • Footwear by Footskins, men and women’s moccasins made in Spring Grove, Minnesota
  • Frye, men’s and women’s boots (select styles only)
  • Gateway Shoes tuxedo shoes, marching band shoes, and uniform shoes are made in Missouri
  • Gurkee’s rope sandals are made in West Virginia. They offer any array of colors and styles.
  • Hathorn Explorer boots are made in Washington.
  • Helm, men’s boots, made in Austin, Texas
  • Hersey Custom Shoe Company makes customized sneakers in Massachusetts.
  • Hoffman Boot pac boots and leather boots are made in Idaho.
  • Island Slipper, women and men’s sandals made in Hawaii Island Slipper is listed in 10 Things We Love, Made in Hawaii
  • Jack Rogers Navajo Sandals, women’s sandals, select styles made in Florida
  • Jen + Kim, women’s heels and custom heels made in Los Angles, California
  • Julie Bees, Women’s Flats made in Atlanta, Georgia
  • Kamik, select styles of toddler and little kids snow boots are assembled in the USA
  • Keen has select styles of assembled in USA low- and high-profile snow and hiking boots for men and women available at Zappos.
  • Kepner Scott, infant and toddler shoes, made in Orwigsburg, Pennsylvania Kepner Scoot is listed in 10 Things We Love,  Made in Pennsylvania
  • L.L. Bean, men and women’s boots, select styles made in Maine since 1912
  • Lucchese manufactures select styles of boots in the USA
  • Manimal, baby and unisex moccasins made in Brooklyn, New York
  • mohop. women’s sandals and flats made in Chicago, Illinois
  • Munro, women’s heels, boots and sandals made in Hot Springs, Arkansas (select styles only)
  • myAnatech, women’s shoes and sandals, made in California
  • Neil M Footwear, made in Wynne, Arkansas
  • New Balance, women and men’s sneakers, select styles made outside of Boston, Massachusetts New Balance is listed in 10 Things We Love, Made in Massachusetts
  • Newbark luxury women’s flats made in California.
  • Nicks Handmade Boots, boots for men and women all handmade in Spokane, Washington
  • Oakstreet Bootmakers, made in Chicago, Illinois
  • Oka b colorful ballet flats and flip flops are made in Georgia.
  • Okabashi, flats and sandals, made in Buford, Georgia Okabashi is listed in 10 Things We Love, Made in Georgia
  • Onex  women’s shoes are handcrafted in California.
  • Perry Ercolino, custom dress shoes are made in Pennsylvania
  • Pierrepont Hicks, women’s chukkas, moccasins, and desert boots made in Maine
  • Piper Sandals, childrens, men and women’s leather sandals, made in San Antonio, Texas
  • PW Minor shoes for men and women are made in New York
  • Quoddy boat shoes are handmade in Maine
  • Rancourt & Co, men’s dress shoes, made in Lewiston, Maine
  • Red Wing, work boots made in Minnesota (select styles only)
  • Russell Moccasin Co. boots and moccasins are handmade in Wisconsin.
  • Salpy Shoes  Truly artisanal shoes designed and built in a Los Angeles factory.
  • SAS (San Antonio Shoes), men and woman’s shoes, made in San Antonio, Texas
  • Scandic Footwear manufactures women’s leather and wood bottom clogs in New England
  • Schnee’s, men and women’s uninsulated rubber-bottom pac boots and hiking boots, made in Bozeman, Montana
  • Sbicca, women’s wedge sandals, select styles made in Los Angles, California
  • Sloggers, women’s rainboots, made in Gardena, California
  • Soft Star shoes for adults and children are made in Oregon.
  • SOM Footwear, quality athletic casual sneaker for men and women made in Colorado Top pick for American made sneakers
  • Steger Mukluks and Moccasins, made in Ely, Minnesota (These are like the made in USA version of UGGs! We love them!)
  • Sven clogs for men, women, and children are made in the USA
  • The Palatines, leather slingbacks, sandals and booties made in Los Angeles, California
  • The Vintage Shoe Company, men and women’s boots, oxfords and flats, made in Pennsylvania
  • Thorogood, men’s boots
  • Truman Boot Co., hand built boots, made in Colorado
  • Vere Sandals, men and women’s flip flops, made in Geneva, New York
  • Walk-Over, men’s casual shoes, select styles made in USA since 1758
  • White’s Boots, men’s jumper boots
  • Wolverine, men’s boots, made in Rockford, Michigan (select styles)
  • Zuzii Footwear manufactures shoes (sandals, clogs, sneakers) for baby, kids, and women in Los Angeles, California.

Our favorite retailers that offer Made in USA shoes

To make your American made shoes even more comfy, try Piggy Pillows’ flip flop insoles or American-made soft gel foot cushions from Body and Sole Comfort. Have we missed anything on this list of American made shoe brands?  Which is your favorite?  Share other American made shoes brands with us.

Disclosure: USA Love List received some products in this post unconditionally for review purposes. Our opinions are always our own, and we aim to write fair and balanced reviews to promo

14
Jul
17

Two Blind Brothers: NYC Clothing

Source: Two Blind Brothers: NYC Clothing

For those who are against charity and helping others, this article is not for you. Two Blind Brothers is about raising money for research to cure blindness by selling made in USA clothing. Plus, the founders take no salary (unlike the Fake President).

About Two Blind Brothers

Lady Liberty

The Brothers

At a young age, Bradford and Bryan Manning were both diagnosed with an eye disease that causes blindness over time. This condition has inspired a special vigilance for details, a passion that carries over into the construction of their clothing line. They are both graduates of the University of Virginia and currently live in NYC.

The Apparel

The apparel is sophisticated, noticeable yet understated, expertly tailored, and intricately crafted: all design decisions are informed with a New York influence. The brothers are involved in every step of the creative process, from choosing fabrics to developing the design aesthetic. Their focus is on ensuring the high quality and careful craftsmanship of each article of clothing.

The Gund

 

The Mission

The production is located in the heart of the fashion district in New York City. Despite the first-rate nature of the designs, fabrics, and assembly, the value to the customer is extraordinary compared to other luxury designers because the brothers fund the operation without being paid a salary. All profits are instead donated to life-changing research to cure blindness.

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Fashion With a Perspective
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Over 180 million people worldwide live with vision impairment

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The founders take NO salary. 100% of profits go to supporting research

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The research is directed by a team of experts in biotechnology

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The fabrics, designs, and construction are sourced in the heart of NYC


Editor’s Note – What is Wrong About Charity?

Several years back, 2012, to be specific, I was absolutely floored when I came upon an article from Made in USA Blog entitled “What’s Wrong with Tom’s Shoes”, which decimated a charity program. I had always felt that everybody, and I mean everybody, no matter what religion, no matter what country,  valued doing good for others – charity. But this self-described Libertarian felt that Tom’s Shoes which donates a pair of shoes to extremely poor people with every pair of shoes purchased was a disgrace. I had attempted numerous times to discuss the notion that charity is not bad, but he deleted all of my responses (except this one [linked above] which is sort of frozen in a time capsule). Obviously, Made in USA Blog will think that this company Two Blind Brothers is also a disgrace.

I have found that the more wealthy a nation is, the less charitable, the nation becomes. This is not only true for nations, but, in general, it is also true to individuals as well. Compared to the United States, the wealthiest nation in the world, people of the Old Testament and The New Testament were much more charitable and giving to the downtrodden and poor than our”modern society”. Americans believe charity begins at home, but not at their home and not in their neighborhood. We, Americans have no problem with concept of charity (except for the Libertarians who feel that helping anybody is a sin) but they expect others to do it but not themselves.

We can only theorize why the more wealthy one is, the less charitable one becomes.  Theory #1) Proximity. The closer one is to the poor and downtrodden, the more one can empathize. The poor are actually much more charitable to other poor (than the wealthy), even though they have less they can afford to give away. It is because they know the struggles – the pain, the cold, the hunger, etc. If you never see the poor and the down-trodden, then the poor become more of an abstraction than real, living, breathing humans. They are no longer part of “us”, but they become “them”. And “them” are always the enemy.

2) Politics of the Wealth. The wealthy know they have it good. And, obviously the wealthy want to keep it that way. In order to keep their wealth, they have found creative ways to maintain it. In order to avoid paying “fair wages”, the wealthy have always opposed unions. Then, they opposed Communism and Socialism – movements which  supported fair wages. Their omnipresent message was so persuasive that Americans soon demonized the word Communism, Socialism and Unions. The rich still continue to strive to decrease pay for workers and they do their best to defeat unions. They have been unbelievably successful. In the 1950s and 1960s, about 50% of private companies were union companies. Now, only 7% of private companies have unions. How did they do this? First, the wealthy moved companies out of union entrenched cities and moved them to non union Southern states. Then, they double-crossed these Southern states who had become dependent on these jobs by creating Free Trade treaties and off-shoring American jobs to poor third world countries. The outsourcing of good paying jobs, especially manufacturing jobs has created a downward trend in American salaries. And the salaries are still going nowhere (and The Federal Minimum Wage has not even come close to keeping up with inflation). In 2017, here in the United States, one can work full time at the Federal minimum wage and still not get out of the Poverty line. Ponder that for a moment. Everyone that works at minimum wage is poor. It means millions more each year become poorer and poorer, while the rich get incredibly rich. Today the top 0.1% have as much wealth as the bottom 90%. And the top 5% now own 70% of all the wealth.

So, what do the rich to deal with the poor. Do they develop a conscious? Do they open up their pocketbooks? Do they $20 out of their $100 million portfolio? No, instead, they create a lie. The Libertarian lie. “If you help people they will all become dependent on it.” That is pure balderdash. Sure there are few scammers, whether they are homeless, or drug addicts or CEOs (Martin Shrkeli or Bernie Madoff),  most non-Republicans, they are honest, see The Charity that gives cash to the Poor from NPR. The wealthy believe their own lies (because they live in their own bubble) and that is why they don’t give to the poor.

 

3) Wealth has become a religion. Being wealthy wasn’t enough, making money has become its own reward. Money has become bigger than the “Golden Calf”. In fact, the worship of money has become bigger than Jehovah, Jesus, Allah and Buddha combined. The United States no longer worship the Bible. “Christian” people say they are “religious”, but never attend church, have never read the Bible don’t know the lessons and certainly do not follow the tenants of Jesus. (But still, somehow, they are still Christian). In the United States, its citizens have been brain-washed into worshiping money. Even poor people, no longer hope of getting into Heaven, but, hope to get rich instead. Actually, the poor, even if they sin frequently, have a better chances of getting into Heaven than they are to get rich, especially, now, with how things are so stacked in blocking people from climbing the ladder to success. With the worship of “$$” comes its philosophy – “Capitalism.” The motto of Capitalism is make money however possible, hook or by crook. Having a conscious will impede you ability to get rich. Leave your principles behind. There is no better examples of this than the Trump family and the modern GOP. Even with the confession of Trump Jr. trying to collude with America’s archenemy, the Russians, to cheat and steal and election, the Trumps see nothing wrong with this. In fact, the GOP is also perfectly fine with this. As long as you win, that is what counts. The Ends justify the means. How Machievellian our society has become. The modern GOP worships money. Take today’s example: the GOP is trying to pass TrumpCare 2.0 wil which end healthcare for over 20 million Americans and severe cut Medicaid – which aids the elderly, the disabled and the Poor. All, so the rich can get a bigger tax break. Is there ever a stronger message about the present Republican Party stands for? The GOP should actually read that Bible they say they hold so dear. Maybe they can learn some lessons. Maybe they can learn some principles? Maybe they can learn the teaching of Jesus. (They should not quote out of context sections of the Old Testament. If they are going to quote from Leviticus, then they should read all of Leviticus and follow all of Leviticus, like thou shall not wear clothing made of mixed fibers). Maybe then they can learn once again about the importance of taking care of the poor. Instead, the GOP worships money and capitalism – which means you should have no principles. That is why the wealthy and their syncophants don’t give to poor and that is why there is a modern and deliberate message to stop charity. This is the modern GOP message:Heil the rich! Ignore the Poor! But here is a message from me to this modern GOP party: expect big political losses soon. People still have principles, it will show up sooner or later. It is taking a little longer than expected.

 

12
Jul
17

Big Sale From Robeworks

Source: Bathrobes | Luxury Bathrobes | Cotton Terry Bathrobe from Robeworks

Robeworks is having a big sale on its most popular robes. Robeworks are all made in the USA. To see the sale click on the top link or here: Robeworks.

The All Season Luxury Bathrobe

Slip into something comfortable with the graceful proportions of this fine bathrobe. Highlighted with a classic color combination the rich burgundy microfiber outer shell with accents of plush black terrycloth will redefine your concept of indulgence – this is the perfect men’s robe or women’s bathrobe! Made in USA with imported material in sizes XS-5XL. (LJ100)

The Finest Hooded Bathrobe You’ll Ever Own

Our comfortable evergreen hooded bathrobes are favorites everywhere! These sleek, versatile robes are the ultimate in relaxation and are ideal as a mans robe or womans bathrobe, the natural warmth of evergreen microfiber enhanced by a lush black terry cloth lining. Made in USA with imported material. Regular Price: $180.00, Sale Price $109.00

Evergreen and Black Hooded Robe

Personalized & Monogrammed Bathrobes

Whether you are celebrating an anniversary, birthday or other special occasion, a personalized robe is the perfect statement or gift. With over 20 years of experience, Robeworks has set the standard for luxury monogrammed bathrobes. Our state-of-the-art, in-house embroidery equipment and expertise allows us to monitor the creation process carefully from start to finish, ensuring superior quality and craftsmanship. Without a doubt, Robework’s personalized bathrobes offer unparalleled excellence, comfort and style.

Please allow four business days for processing your personalized bathrobe. We also offer professional logo robe options for your business, hotel or spa. Ask about our customizable wholesale bathrobes.

Editor’s Note:

These are great high-quality, great feeling robes. I know because I have had one for the past two years. These bathrobes should last you for many years. And with this great sale, it makes me think about getting another robe.

09
Jul
17

New Thai labor rules send migrant workers packing for home – The Washington Post

Source: New Thai labor rules send migrant workers packing for home – The Washington Post

New Thai Labor Rules Send Migrant Workers Packing For Home.

This news seems to have nothing with the Made in the USA movement but if you look at this closely it has everything do do with it. Please see the end of the article for why it is pertinent.

An immigration official checks a vehicle before it leaves for Myanmar at a border checkpoint in the northern Thai province of Tak. Around 30,000 migrant workers have left Thailand.

July 3
BANGKOK — Fearful that Thailand’s new labor rules will get them into trouble, tens of thousands of migrant workers are returning to neighboring Myanmar, Cambodia and Laos, causing hardship to themselves and their Thai employers.Labor regulations that took effect June 23 could give foreign workers without proper permits up to five years in prison, while their employers could face fines of up to 800,000 baht ($23,500).Officials and workers’ advocates estimated Monday that roughly 30,000 workers have returned home since the rules took effect.Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha, under pressure from industries employing the migrants, says he’ll institute a 120-day extension of the deadline for worker registration.Thailand has about 2.6 million foreign workers, mostly from its poorer neighbors Myanmar, Cambodia and Laos. Half are estimated to be working illegally. Many work in low-paying or dangerous jobs that Thais are reluctant to take, in fields such as construction, farming and fishing.

Thailand’s Labor Rights Promotion Network, a migrant rights advocate group, estimates that more than 30,000 workers have gone back home and that the number will keep increasing if the government does not come out with measures to reassure workers of their rights and safety.

Police Col. Man Ratanaprateep, based in the northern Thai province of Tak, which borders on Myanmar, said that as of Monday, more than 23,000 workers had crossed back to Myanmar at the province’s Mae Sot checkpoint alone, but others may have gone back at unofficial crossings.

 The regulations have caused the loss of 40,000 to 80,000 migrant workers from the construction industry, according to Suwat Liptapanlop, president of Thai Contractors Association. He did not say how many workers left on their own, or how many were pushed out by nervous employers.

[“We found that many workers were told to leave, some without being paid, by their employers. Now, with such a massive outflow, the government is talking about the grace period,” said Patima Tungpuchayakul of the Labor Rights Promotion Network, which is involved in the protection of migrant workers. “But the damage is already done. Poor migrant workers already are panicking and leaving the country. These are people who can’t afford travel expenses or living without employment.”

 She noted that workers who left would face a new round of expenses should they seek to return to work legally, because they would have to come up with payment fees to employment agencies. This could force them to borrow money again, making their labor a way of paying off the debt, a cycle that is known as debt bondage.] (This part was deleted by the Washington Post but was in the San Francisco Chronicle and SF Gate – funny what some newspapers will delete – Ed.)

Cambodia’s embassy in Thailand issued a statement over the weekend urging migrant workers to stay calm. It said the embassy and Labor Ministry officials were negotiating with Thai authorities, asking them not to crack down.

“Many migrants are fleeing Thailand voluntarily at a high cost; some employers cover costs, but many are also unceremoniously fired without compensation,” said Andy Hall, a longtime human rights worker with extensive experience with migrant workers.

“Thailand’s government is completely irresponsible, treating these low-skilled workers with high value to its economy like dispensable second-class citizens who don’t deserve basic treatment in accordance with international human rights standards,” he said.


Editor’s Note

Let us connect the dots to see how this story is pertinent to Made in USA products. Thailand like China have done great economically over the past 25 years by doubling down on cheap exports. So how do these Asian products come so cheap? First, you create relations with very wealthy American corporations and CEO’s who then lobby Washington who then create “Free Trade deals” which basically removes import taxes from these products from China – which undermines basic economic sanity. Import taxes were implemented so other countries do not undercut your own country’s products which would destroy American businesses, economy and jobs (which has happened). Why pass Free Trade treaties like NAFTA, WTO and TPP? One word: Greed. Then you have the added bonus of Free Trade policies – destroying of unions and decreasing wages of the middle class (Definite win, win and win for the top 1%.)

Second, you hire people at a very low price who get no benefits, no overtime,  and no safety restrictions. And then when you can’t get enough people in the city to work in these miserable conditions, you send out “agents” to recruit people from the agricultural areas to come to work. How do you get these people to work in the city? Answer: Debt bondage. For the promise of a better life (actually a lie), agents will charge these future employees fees for being recruited, for travel expenses, and for miscellaneous. Sometimes these workers will have to work for many months or years to get out this debt. (Slave Labor). Then, when you run out of people from farms, then you start recruiting from other countries. This has been happening for years in China and Thailand. For Thailand, the number of illegal immigrant workers is up to 2.6 million workers.

So this is the situation we are in now. American companies every day are outsourcing jobs to China, Thailand, Bangladesh, India, etc so we can have slave labor make cheap Old Navy clothing for us, while American workers salaries diminish and the American economy languishes. Sorry, Fake President, the economy is not doing well. A GDP of 0.7% is not good. Obviously this is not an ideal system, sooner or later, Americans might get physically ill when they realize that they are enabling slave labor all over the world. (Or not). But, also, countries will eventually run out of immigrants to work. This may take another 10-15 years. And then what? Finally, the cheap labor countries will start to paying their workers more. But this will be much too late to have any effect on American companies who will continue to outsource or go under, unless U.S. consumers change their mindset and their buying habits.

Last Item: Migration. This story shows that you do not need a wall to stop immigrants from coming in. In fact, the wall is a great folly. It won’t stop any immigration. What would stop immigration? Answer: An immigration policy that makes sense. In the Thailand policy, it threatens immigrants without proper paperwork with prison time up to 5 years (not just deportation) but even more importantly, punishes the employers who hire the illegal immigrants $23,500 for each worker. It would stop the hypocrites who rally against illegal immigrants who still hire these same illegal immigrants. Now, if you were truly serious about immigration, the policy would need to hit both sides: the employee and the employer.

So how about the jobs that regular Americans shun, the ones that only immigrants often work, like farming, roofers,housekeeper, graders/sorters and drywall/stucco installers? Would “regular” Americans take over the void? Unlikely. The most reasonable work around would be allowing more immigrant to work these jobs, but with the proper paperwork. This system should work well until the Republican Party allows the gross abuse of the system – then we would be back at the same place.




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